• Farmington Animal Hospital
  • 204 Farmington Avenue,
  • Farmington,
  • Connecticut,
  • 06032
  • Phone: 860 677-4400
  • Email: vetbiz@fahct.com

Library

Cats + Diagnosis

  • Addison’s disease or hypoadrenocorticism results from decreased corticosteroid and mineralocorticoid production from the adrenal glands. This results in non-specific signs of illness that mimic many other diseases. Laboratory changes consistent with Addison’s disease include anemia, absence of a stress leukogram (in a sick/stressed pet), hypoglycemia, elevated potassium, and low sodium causing a low sodium:potassium ratio, elevated kidney values and high urine specific gravity. Although an elevated resting blood cortisol level can rule out Addison’s disease, an ACTH stimulation test is needed to diagnose Addison’s disease. This requires a resting blood cortisol sample, administration of synthetic ACTH and a blood cortisol level 1-2 hours later to assess the adrenal response to ACTH. Consistently low levels of cortisol despite ACTH stimulation confirm the diagnosis. Primary Addison’s and secondary/atypical Addison’s can be differentiated by assessing the amount of endogenous ACTH in the blood.

  • Abdominal enlargement in cats may occur due to a simple cause such as obesity, pregnancy, or intestinal parasites; however, it can also be a symptom of different illnesses including heart disease, organ enlargement, cancer, FIP, trauma, and rarely hyperadrenocorticism or hypothyroidism. Identifying the cause of abdominal enlargement can take several steps starting with history and physical exam, progressing to screening tests including bloodwork and urinalysis. The CBC is assessed for signs of anemia, low platelets, or signs of inflammation. A biochemistry profile may reveal liver or kidney dysfunction, hypo- or hyperproteinemia, hypoglycemia, or other abnormalities. Urinalysis is used to fully interpret the biochemistry and check for abnormal urinary sediment. Based on the findings of the screening tests, additional diagnostics may include imaging, EKG, tissue biopsy, or fluid analysis.

  • Coughing can have many different causes. Important for the diagnosis is a thorough history, physical exam, and screening tests including CBC, biochemistry profile, urinalysis, fecal testing (including fecal Baermann), heartworm testing, and chest radiographs. Additional, more advanced diagnostics, may be needed including ultrasound, thoracocentesis, transtracheal wash, bronchoscopy, or bronchoalveolar lavage. Culture and sensitivity testing, fungal serology, and cytology may be performed on fluid/tissue that is sampled.

  • Listlessness and inappetence are vague signs that can occur in pets for many reasons, both physical and mental. Conditions that produce these signs include grief, anxiety, oral disease, organ dysfunction, and cancer. Diagnosis starts with taking a thorough history and physical exam and may progress to screening tests including a CBC, biochemistry profile, and urinalysis. Other diagnostic tests that may be needed include hormonal tests, liver function tests, imaging (radiographs or ultrasound), culture and sensitivity, or specific tests for infectious diseases or immune mediated disease.

  • Diarrhea can be caused by many different things, some easier to diagnose than others. Simple diarrhea with no other clinical signs may not require diagnostic testing, but if diarrhea is ongoing or your pet is showing other clinical signs then baseline diagnostic testing including complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry profile, urinalysis, and fecal testing may be recommended. Additional diagnostic testing may be required depending on the results of these tests.

  • Fever of unknown origin is a term used for persistent fever in pets. It has many causes including infection, immune-mediated disease and cancer. Initial steps in diagnosis are history and physical exam, followed by standard screening tests including CBC, biochemistry profile, and urinalysis. Based on the results of these tests, further testing may be indicated such as imaging (radiographs and/or ultrasound), fine needle aspiration, joint taps, bacterial or fungal cultures of affected fluid/tissue, and specific testing for diseases such as feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, or Lyme disease.

  • Heartworm disease is a parasitic disease that typically affects dogs but can occasionally occur in cats. Heartworm is usually diagnosed with a simple blood test. There are two main tests for detecting heartworm infection; one test detects adult worms and the other detects microfilaria. Unlike in dogs, treatment options are limited. Heartworm preventives are available for cats. Your veterinarian can advise you on the best prevention program for your cat.

  • Inappropriate urination happen in well-trained pets for many reasons, including inflammation, infection, estrogen deficiency, kidney failure, diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, Cushing's disease, neurological disease, or behavioral issues. A number of screening tests will be performed by your veterinarian to determine the root cause of the inappropriate urination. These tests may include complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis. Depending on the results of the screening tests, your veterinarian may recommend further testing including culture and sensitivity, cytology, X-rays or ultrasound, and stone analysis.

  • An increased appetite can be normal in an animal that has higher than normal energy requirements such as nursing, high energy sports, and growth in puppies or kittens. Many diseases can cause an increased appetite in the face of illness including hyperthyroidism in cats, Cushing’s disease, intestinal disease, diabetes or insulinoma, intestinal parasitism, and cancer. Increased appetite can also be caused by certain medications such as corticosteroids. Diagnosis generally requires a thorough history, physical exam, CBC, biochemistry panel, thyroxine (in cats), and urinalysis. Additional diagnostic testing may be required based on findings of the initial screening tests.

  • These clinical signs are non-specific and can be caused by many different diseases or conditions. Usually increased production of dilute urine results in a compensatory increase in water consumption, but occasionally the condition is one of increased water intake resulting in the production of large volumes of dilute urine.