• Farmington Animal Hospital
  • 204 Farmington Avenue,
  • Farmington,
  • Connecticut,
  • 06032
  • Phone: 860 677-4400
  • Email: vetbiz@fahct.com

Library

Cats + Treatment

  • Sometimes, the location of your cat's wound or the amount of skin lost can prevent surgical closure or bandaging. This handout describes general guidelines for proper care of your cat's open wound at home, though your veterinarian can provide you with specific instructions.

  • The general instructions for incision care are the same for all surgical incisions. There may be some differences, however, depending on the type of surgery and the material used to close the incision. This handout is a guide to caring for your cat's surgical incision(s) at home for optimal recovery.

  • When your cat is being treated for an illness, it is very important that you follow your veterinarian's advice and instructions precisely. Take your cat for re-examination if and when requested. If your cat's condition worsens unexpectedly, contact your veterinarian for advice immediately. Early diagnosis and treatment will provide the best outcome for your cat’s recovery.

  • Cefpodoxime is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat skin infections in dogs. It is also used off-label in cats and to treat other types of infection. It is given orally in tablet or liquid form. Side effects are uncommon. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Cephalexin (brand names Rilexine®, Keflex®, Vetolexin®) is an oral antibiotic used to treat pyoderma and other bacterial skin infections in dogs and is used off-label in cats to treat pyoderma and other types of skin infections. It is sometimes used off-label to treat urinary tract infections in cats and dogs. Side effects of cephalexin are rare and usually mild.

  • Cetirizine is given by mouth and is used off-label to treat and prevent pruritus (itching) associated with atopic dermatitis, urticaria (hives), and insect bite reactions in cats and dogs. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include vomiting and increased salivation. Do not use it in pets that are allergic to it or hydroxyzine. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • This handout discusses the use of cryosurgery in pets. This technique involves the use of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissues. A short discussion in included as to how the technique is used, and in what circumstances it may be appropriate to use.

  • An E-collar or cone may be needed after your cat has surgery or if she has a wound. Your cat should wear the E-collar following the directions provided by your veterinarian. You may need to make a few adjustments in your home to ensure your cat does not get stuck in confined spaces. Also, you may need to adjust her feeding station to assist with her eating habits.

  • Feline eosinophilic keratitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the cornea that results in the surface of the eye appearing pink, white, or chalky. It is caused by an accumulation of inflammatory cells called eosinophils. The clinical signs, appearance, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition are explained in this handout.

  • Many liquid potpourri products and essential oils, including oil of cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, tea tree (melaleuca), wintergreen, and ylang ylang, are poisonous to cats. Both ingestion and skin exposure can be toxic.